REVIEW: The Philosopher Queens, Rebecca Buxton & Lisa Whiting (ed.) #BLOGTOUR

Wednesday, 23 September 2020

REVIEW: The Philosopher Queens, Rebecca Buxton & Lisa Whiting (ed.) Blog Tour Graphic

 Where are the women philosophers? 

The answer is right here. 

The history of philosophy has not done women justice: you've probably heard the names Plato, Kant, Nietzsche and Locke - but what about Hypatia, Arendt, Oluwole and Young? 

The Philosopher Queens is a long-awaited book about the lives and works of women in philosophy by women in philosophy. 

This collection brings to centre stage twenty prominent women whose ideas have had a profound - but for the most part uncredited - impact on the world. 

You'll learn about Ban Zhao, the first woman historian in ancient Chinese history; Angela Davis, perhaps the most iconic symbol of the American Black Power Movement; Azizah Y. al-Hibri, known for examining the intersection of Islamic law and gender equality; and many more. 

For anyone who has wondered where the women philosophers are, or anyone curious about the history of ideas - it's time to meet the philosopher queens.


Every so often, a reoccurring goal pops to the front of my mind: the desire, the need, to understand philosophy. Even just a little part of it. Even just barely. I have checked out library books, taken online courses, signed up for webinars but somehow, I just always seem to end up stuck in the starters’ block. I think it is because, no matter how hard I try, the intro-101 books always come off as exceedingly pale, male and stale. 

Which is why, when the title, cover and overarching ethos of The Philosopher Queens: The Lives and Legacies of Philosophy's Unsung Women popped into my line of sight, I immediately knew that I had to get my hands on it. I mean, twenty biographies of female philosophers *by* twenty female philosophers, complete with absolutely gorgeous, full-colour illustrations - how could anyone say no?

Hint: they can’t.

The editors of this collection, Rebecca Buxton and Lisa Whiting, have undoubtedly brought together, and participated in, something truly beautiful. It is accessible, loving, inspirational - a chorus of lives and voices, depicted with a great deal of reverence, rising up in a battle cry. 

There is something utterly beguiling when a book like this one, leans into the realm of narrative nonfiction; if only in the way it details the authors’ deep and personal connection to the women they are writing about. It means that there is heart there, as well as a desire to gain great knowledge. And it is only through the acknowledgement and inclusion of that, that its readers are truly and wholeheartedly spurred on to true enlightenment. 

After-all, it certainly encouraged me on to finally dip a little deeper passed those 101s. Because now I know that a philosophy is there for me, if only I am open and willing to find it.


Thanks to Unbound and Anne Cater for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.


Head on over to http://tidd.ly/3b4237b for this book, as well as all of the others featured in my reviews, complete with the added bonuses of free worldwide shipping and bringing a little joy to my life.

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