Dewey’s 24 Hour Readathon (Autumn 2018) – Book Bingo (Week 2)

Friday, 5 October 2018


Week 2! Do you know what? I'm actually starting to get rather good at this. Expect me to be smug about it at least for another few weeks.

A Book to Movie/TV Show Adaptation
Stardust
In a countryside town bordering on a magical land, a young man makes a promise to his beloved that he'll retrieve a fallen star by venturing into the magical realm.
Reason: No one actually clarified whether this meant to watch one or to read one (I know it's book bingo but, at this point, you can never assume) so I took a bit of initiative and just went with counting the movie. Is this cheating? Probably. Do I care? Not one bit.

A Book Outside of Your Comfort Zone
New in the Little People, Big Dreams series, discover the incredible life of Simone de Beauvoir, the great French philosopher, in this true story of her life. With stylish and quirky illustrations and extra facts at the back, this empowering series celebrates the important life stories of wonderful women of the world. From designers and artists to scientists, all of them went on to achieve incredible things, yet all of them began life as a little child with a dream. These books make the lives of these role models accessible for children, providing a powerful message to inspire the next generation of outstanding people who will change the world!
Reason: As someone who likes to think of themselves as a person who is forever reading high-brow, pretentious-for-the-sake-of-it, adult literary fiction, a children's picture book definitely inhabits an entirely different world to the books I usually read.

A Book With Diversity
At a cafe table in Lahore, a bearded Pakistani man converses with an uneasy American stranger. As dusk deepens to night, he begins the tale that has brought them to this fateful encounter... Changez is living an immigrant's dream of America. At the top of his class at Princeton, he is snapped up by an elite valuation firm. He thrives on the energy of New York, and his budding romance with elegant, beautiful Erica promises entry into Manhattan society at the same exalted level once occupied by his own family back in Lahore. But in the wake of September 11, Changez finds his position in his adopted city suddenly overturned and his relationship with Erica shifting. And Changez's own identity is in seismic shift as well, unearthing allegiances more fundamental than money, power, and maybe even love.
Reason: An exquisitely-written book that examines the experience of Muslim immigrants in the United States after 9/11.

A Book With a Male Protagonist
In Magic Hours, award-winning essayist Tom Bissell explores the highs and lows of the creative process. He takes us from the set of The Big Bang Theory to the first novel of Ernest Hemingway to the final work of David Foster Wallace; from the films of Werner Herzog to the film of Tommy Wiseau to the editorial meeting in which Paula Fox's work was relaunched into the world. Originally published in magazines such as The Believer, The New Yorker, and Harper's, these essays represent ten years of Bissell's best writing on every aspect of creation—be it Iraq War documentaries or video-game character voices—and will provoke as much thought as they do laughter. What are sitcoms for exactly? Can art be both bad and genius? Why do some books survive and others vanish? Bissell's exploration of these questions make for gripping, unforgettable reading.
Reason: Although this is an essay collection, Bissell's anecdotal experiences of being an investigative journalism and his life as a book editor plays an incredibly prominent role. Some (namely myself) would say too prominent. 

A Book With the Sky on the Cover
In 1944, sixteen-year-old Edith Eger was sent to Auschwitz. There she endured unimaginable experiences, including being made to dance for the infamous Josef Mengele. Over the coming months, Edith’s bravery helped her sister to survive, and led to her bunkmates rescuing her during a death march. When their camp was finally liberated, Edith was pulled from a pile of bodies, barely alive. In The Choice, Dr Edith Eger shares her experience of the Holocaust and the remarkable stories of those she has helped ever since. Today, she is an internationally acclaimed psychologist whose patients include survivors of abuse and soldiers suffering from PTSD. She explains how many of us live within a mind that has become a prison, and shows how freedom becomes possible once we confront our suffering.
Reason: I believe the cover is supposed to be Auschwitz? Eger's experience of both Nazi concentration camps and forced labour camps is vast so the possibilities are innumerable but, no matter what hell it depicts, the sky still looks on overhead.


*Thanks to NetGalley and the publisher for sending me a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.

Head on over to http://bit.ly/2y7JSWV for these books, as well as all of the others featured in my reviews, complete with the added bonuses of free worldwide shipping and bringing a little joy to my life.

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