REVIEW: This Green and Pleasant Land, Ayisha Malik #BLOGTOUR

Saturday, 17 October 2020


Accountant Bilal Hasham and his journalist wife, Mariam, plod along contentedly in the sleepy, chocolate box village they've lived in for eight years. Then Bilal is summoned to his dying mother's bedside in Birmingham. Sakeena Hasham is not long for this world but refuses to leave it until she ensures that her son remembers who he is: a Muslim, however much he tries to ignore it. She has a final request. Instead of whispering her prayers in her dying moments, she instructs Bilal to go home to his village, Babbels End, and build a mosque. 

Mariam is horrified. The villagers are outraged. How can a grieving Bilal choose between honouring his beloved mum's last wish and preserving everything held dear in the village he calls home? But it turns out home means different things to different people. Battle lines are drawn and this traditional little community becomes the colourful canvas on which the most current and fundamental questions of identity, friendship, family and togetherness are played out. What makes us who we are, who do we want to be, and how far would we go to fight for it?

REVIEW: All Your Little Lies, Marianne Holmes #BLOGTOUR

Friday, 16 October 2020

Annie lives a quiet, contained, content life. She goes to work. She meets her friend. She’s nearly in a relationship. She’s happy. Not lonely at all. If only more people could see how friendly she is — how eager to help and please. Then she could tick “Full Happy Life” off her list. But no one sees that side of Annie and she can’t understand why. That all changes the night Chloe Hills disappears. And Annie is the last person to see her. This is her chance to prove to everybody that she’s worth something. That is, until she becomes a suspect.

REVIEW: Stick a Flag In It, Arran Lomas

Thursday, 1 October 2020

 From the Norman Invasion in 1066 to the eve of the First World War, Stick a Flag in It is a thousand-year jocular journey through the history of Britain and its global empire. 

The British people have always been eccentric, occasionally ingenious and, sure, sometimes unhinged - from mad monarchs to mass-murdering lepers. 

Here, Arran Lomas shows us how they harnessed those traits to forge the British nation, and indeed the world, we know today. 

Follow history's greatest adventurers from the swashbuckling waters of the Caribbean to the vast white wasteland of the Antarctic wilderness, like the British spy who infiltrated a top-secret Indian brothel and the priest who hid inside a wall but forgot to bring a packed lunch. 

At the very least you'll discover Henry VIII's favourite arse-wipe, whether the flying alchemist ever made it from Scotland to France, and the connection between Victorian coffee houses and dildos. 

Forget what you were taught in school - this is history like you've never heard it before, full of captivating historical quirks that will make you laugh out loud and scratch your head in disbelief.